Flail Mowers

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What is a Flail Mower?

A flail mower features “flails” that are bent T- or Y-shaped pieces of metal attached to a rotating drum at the thin end of the flail. As the drum spins, these flails spin at a rate that allows them to tear through the brush. These flails are spaced out across and around the drum to provide a thorough cut. The drum itself is powered through PTO drive.


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Standard Flail Mower Series

standard duty flail mower

medium duty flail mower

heavy duty flail mower

The Advantages of a Flail Mower

Flail mowers have quite a number of advantages over the common rotary mower and make themselves useful for specialized situations.

  • Much like sickle mowers, flail mowers do not throw up much in terms of debris. This makes flail mowers useful in areas where flying debris needs to be kept to a minimum.
  • Also, like sickle mowers, flail mowers can be angled to cut banks as well as to trim bushes and shrubbery, making them useful for landscapers and maintenance departments who want flexibility from a single unit.
  • Because of the flails being attached on a hinge or change instead of being fixed and stiff, they will simply bounce and deflect off of objects such as rocks and stumps. These means that they won’t shatter or throw the debris into the air, and they also will not break or warp due to the impact. This can keep you from needing to repair them or replace them as often.
  • If a flail is damaged, you only have to replace one small, inexpensive flail instead of an entire blade.
  • The heft of the flails and their state of motion makes them capable of attacking severe brush – many flails can take out saplings up to 2 inches in width. They won’t dull when trying to take down thick brush either.

Specialty Flail Mower Series

super heavy duty flail mower

commercial duty flail mowers

ditch bank flail mowers

How does this differ from a brush hog?

 

Brush hogs are great for mowing large over-grown grassy areas and can tackle tall, thick grass with ease. They can be run at fairly high ground speeds, meaning more acreage can be covered in a given time. This increased production comes at the cost of a lower quality cut and the potential for clumping and piling of clippings. Brush hogs with their simple blades are also easy to maintain. However, another downside of the brush hog pertains to safety. With its rotary motion, objects can be thrown in any direction; therefore, mowing in areas with debris—rocks, trash, sticks—should be undertaken with great caution.

Specific Features Flail Mowers

adjustable hydraulic offset mowers

Mulcher Flail Mowers

Why use a flail mower?

Flail mowers are better at cutting vines and brush. This makes them the perfect choice for areas that are not only grassy but also overgrown with other types of vegetation. Their design does a nice job of mulching what is cut thus returning nutrients to the soil. Adding to their versatility, some of our models can be extended to the side and angled to cut ditches and banks. Their linear cut and design also reduce the risk of thrown debris making them a better choice for mowing areas with rocks, woody material and even litter, or anywhere people may be present nearby. If damaged, the flails are simple to replace.